“If you need to, sell your blood. But never stop your child from attending school”.

I am a Library Officer (Digital Collections) Copyright, Digitisation and Repositories at the RMIT University in Melbourne.

My life was full of struggle since childhood. I was born in Bangladesh. My parents never encouraged me to go to school due to an extreme poverty in family; there was no food to eat every day, no money to buy study materials, pay school fees. I had to help my parents with farming to survive, and often my mother would tell me off for taking the time to study. Continue reading



“Wealth building happens outside of the 9-5”

I am a property investment coach.

I wasn’t a very good student in high school, mostly because I had a very difficult relationship with my parents: we didn’t get on at all. Home life was a constant struggle, which overflowed into my school life. I barely graduated.

After school, I went straight to the army for my compulsory military service. I didn’t like the army either. I mean, it’s not like I was expecting to get a nice ‘thank you’ – I realized I was doing my duty – but the commanders went out of their way to abuse and humiliate us, which cut too close to the bone, reminding me of home. Continue reading



“Going home empty-handed was not an option”

I am a chef de partie at MoVida Next Door in Melbourne.

My first passion was IT. I’ve always loved doing it, starting with high school. It was really interesting, especially in Zimbabwe where I am from, because it is a developing country and it’s a relatively new thing there.

After I finished my A-levels , I did a graduate diploma in IT at National Institute of Technology. NIT is an Indian college, but they have a subsidiary in Zimbabwe. Originally I wanted to be a systems engineer, but I ended up doing network engineering at NIT, because in order to do systems you had to have really high grades, which I lacked unfortunately! Continue reading



“I get excited about new gadgets,  about making something work in a new way. You do a little “whoo-hoo!” 

I work as a contact centre specialist for a telecommunications company.

At high school, I did a business course that involved work placement for a chartered accountant, and at the end of that, they offered me a job. I finished school on Friday and started work on Monday! I was 17.

There, I got to use one of the first Wang minicomputers – not really ‘mini’ by today’s standards. This was late 70’s. I ended up being the data entry person, a new role at the time. Continue reading